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Pocket Mindmap 1.3

Tutorial

 

 

JKRB Software
Copyright © 2001-2004

 

Revision: 2


Content

 

Content 2

About this Document 4

Mind Mapping. 4

Classic vs. CAMM... 5

General Concepts. 5

New Menu. 6

Copy & Paste. 6

Document List 7

Main Topic. 7

Brainstorming. 7

Restructuring and Qualifying. 8

References. 8

Scribbles. 9

Map Editor 9

Navigating the Map(s) 9

Scrolling. 9

Panning. 10

Center 10

Search. 10

Hyperlinks. 10

Map Link. 11

Select Map. 11

Reference Jump. 11

Back and Forward arrows. 12

Entering Topics. 12

Multi Line Titles. 13

Arrange Topics. 13

Delete Topics. 13

Promoting to Map. 14

References. 14

Reference Types. 15

Magic Symbols. 17

Adding Scribbles. 17

Scribble Editor 17

Pen width. 18

Pen Color 18

Free Drawing. 18

Select single Stroke. 18

Select Rectangle. 19

Delete selected Strokes. 19

Unselect a complex selection. 19

Outline View.. 19

Export 19

Text Export 20

HTML Export 20

Bitmap Export 20

Task View.. 20

Helper Functions. 21

Outlook. 21

Re-Link Tasks. 21

Map. 22

Order 22

Index. 22

 

 


About this Document

 

The following styles are use throughout the document to make it easier to read:

 

 

This document will be updated in irregular intervals to accommodate newer version of the software or to correct errors. You can download a current version on www.pocketmindmap.com. The document is identified by its unique ID (INDOORID) on the server. The ID of this document is “PMM.Tutorial.EN”. With this ID the document can be located independent of its location on the Server.

 

This document is related to Version 1.3 of Pocket Mindmap. It will be updated when new versions are released.

 

The document and the related software are protected by international copyright laws.

Mind Mapping[1]

This document doesn’t want to tell a lot about Mind Mapping itself. There are lots of good books and seminars on that topic, and in the World Wide Web you find lots of resources as well. With this tutorial we want to explain how to work with Pocket Mindmap – at least we want to show you one way to do it, because we found that there are many ways people use Pocket Mindmap in their everyday tasks very successfully.

 

Classic vs. CAMM

CAMM stands for Computer Aided Mind Mapping – a term we invented for shortness and because everyone seems to invent some acronyms. Drawing a Mind Map manually can sometimes be near to creating a peace of art. I have seen Mind Maps so beautiful to look at; I would put them on the wall, framed. They are real art.

My own non CAMM Mind Maps are more of the practical category. They usually fail to fit on the sheet, independently of the size of the sheet, and get more compressed in the border regions. Often I had to continue them on another sheet. So, after I discovered Mind Mapping for me, I almost immediately dreamed of a CAMM solution. Fortunately there was one. I discovered Mindjets MindManager and was happy. I still am, still using that program on my desktop. On all my concepts, Plans etc. I use Mind Maps as a valuable aid for thinking. To have a CAMM solution with me, wherever I go – restaurants, meetings or even in the cinema – came true with the advent of the Pocket PC. These little machines where small enough to go with me all the time, but have the required power to run applications like Pocket Mindmap. After looking some time for a ready solution on the market we decided to create one on our own.

While making a compromise on the art character of the resulting map and the limitations of the display size it is meanwhile my main tool on everyday purposes, because of its mobility and connectivity. The enormous amounts of positive feedback from our customers kept us developing the program further, explore new platforms (Handheld PC) and connecting to the Desktop (with PMMPartner or via XML data exchange).

General Concepts

To understand the full functionality of Pocket Mindmap, you should think a bit about the basic activities that can be involved in creating a Mind Map. While appearing in sequence within this section, the activities are normally not in a fixed order. These activities are repeated alternating during a Mind Map Session.

New Menu

On the Pocket PC, Pocket Mindmap is integrated with the New Menu of the Operating System. You can easyli create a new Map by tapping on the New menu and selecting a Pocket Mindmap the same way you create a new email or a new Pocket Word Document.

Copy & Paste

For effective working the concept of copy & paste is a very important and basic feature. A lot of synergy is created when you take information from one application and enter it into another without retyping everything. While this is known to everyone, we get many requests of people not knowing how to do this, especially on a Pocket PC.

There are several ways to use this functionality, even on the Pocket PC. If you have the virtual keyboard active, you can use the same shortcut keys as on the Desktop PC:

 

Ctrl-C = Copy

Ctrl-V = Paste

Ctrl-X = Cut

 

If you don’t like the virtual keyboard, you can also use the menu functions. Very often they are “hidden” in context menus. Just tap and hold on a text box or a selected text in an application, and the menu appears.

 

The copied data is transferred to an internal storage of the operating system – the clipboard. From there it can be pasted into another part of the application or even in another application. Pocket Mindmap allows you to use the clipboard to easy exchange information between applications on the Pocket PC and Handheld PC.

 

Note: Sometimes applications not only put text into the clipboard but also formatting and other information regarding your selection. That’s why Pocket Mindmap can copy and paste whole maps with all structural information via the clipboard!

Document List

Like many other Pocket PC applications, Pocket Mindmap supports the Document List to manage documents. The list shows all your Pocket Mindmap documents, as long as they are stored within the “My Documents” folder either in the main memory of you Pocket PC or in a storage card. If you start Pocket Mindmap the first time on you machine, it doesn’t show you an empty list (because there are no Pocket Mindmap documents stored yet) but opens a new document for you automatically.

The new document presents its main map, which consists of a single central topic. This is called “subject” by default and should be renamed for real usage.

 

Note, that the Document List is a concept of the Pocket PC. On the Handheld PC and on other platforms there is likely another mechanism to browse your files.

Main Topic

This is usually the most simple act on during Mind mapping because it is usual the cause for you to create a Mind Map. It’s the center of your attention during the following phases – and that’s why we write it in the center of our new Mind Map. The center topic of a map is the origin of all other topics.

Since Pocket Mindmap allows you to have multiple maps in one document, there is more than one central topic in a document. While this is true, there is still only one central topic (or main topic) in each map. And there is one map in the topmost position of the document, which defines the very most central topic. You can see the hierarchy in the outline mode.

Brainstorming

In the phase of a brainstorming you are usually very “productive” and want to enter the topics very quickly. This phase is very important, and you should not destroy the flow of ideas by tampering with the program or with the structure of your information or even with typos you entered. Just enter the topics.

You usually do this in the Map Editor of Pocket Mindmap. Here you can enter the information very quick and also see the visual appearance of other topics you already entered. You may have them still in an unordered way or already partly structured and associated to symbols or other visual improvements like font color or a marker.

To enter a new topic, just type it in. Depending on your previous selection, it is placed as a new top level node or as a sub topic.

Restructuring and Qualifying

This phase is like ordering your thoughts. Bring your first level topics to their place on the map somewhere around the main topic in the center. The first level topics are the top level if the map is switched to the outline view. The numbering occurs in an order known from the hours on a watch face, so the most important are near one o clock. During this phase you move the first level items around with your stylus.

You can also subjugate an item under another – just move it on the desired parent topic and note the drop indicator. It selects one quarter of the target topic to show you where the dragged topic is placed if you drop it. The indicator shows you four different targets:

 

·        Drop as a new child of the target.

·        Drop as a new child of the target.

·        Drop as a peer above the drop target

·        Drop as a peer beneath the drop target.

 

References

During the restructuring and qualifying phase the topics are set in relation to each other. They build a tree structure, which can also bee seen as an outline (Pocket Mindmap provides an outline view as an alternate view format for you). But many topics in real life have additional relations that cannot be described in a tree structure without entering a topic more than once. While this may be also an acceptable solution you can use another feature of Pocket Mindmap to define relations between topics: References.

References define a relation between two topics in your map. Since there are different relations in the real world, Pocket Mindmap provides the possibility to use References of a predefined type or to define a custom reference. You can define as many references as you want.

 

Read more on References in the References Section or in the Pocket Mindmap Reference.

Scribbles

Free drawing is one of the very important aspects in creating Mind Maps. A picture is worth a thousand words, so we wanted to integrate this in Pocket Mindmap. Scribble – a simple and quick editor for simple drawings implements this functionality. The scribbles are attached to the topics. A Magic Symbol in the Map View indicates a Scribble. Read more on Scribbles in a later section on page 9.

Map Editor

While explaining the features und concepts of the Map Editor we start to create our practicing holiday map in parallel. The activities for creating the map are written in a different text style.

 

Navigating the Map(s)

In the real world, maps are used to navigate (usually from A to B). But how do we navigate a Mindmap? Especially when it is grown very huge and consists of hundreds of topics in dozens of maps in a single document? Pocket Mindmap provides several functionalities to get around in your Mind Map. Some of them are very common in other Windows, Pocket PC or Handheld PC Applications as well, like scrolling or panning, searching or following a hyperlink. Pocket Mindmap uses the same techniques, and adds some more for specialized cases.

 

Scrolling

When in the map view, you see only a part of the “virtual paper” the map is drawn on. The virtual paper is much bigger than your display, so your maps can grow very big. They can even grow bigger than the virtual paper because there are many sheets of virtual paper your map document can spread on, but that’s for another chapter.

You can move the virtual paper under your display by panning or scrolling. Use the scroll bars on the right and at the bottom edges of the map view to move the paper. Note that the paper seems to move in the opposite direction of you moves. This is because you don’t move the paper, but the display window over the paper.

Panning

Panning is a very similar functionality to scrolling, but moves the paper in the desired direction. Panning is done by using your stylus on a blank part of the paper. Note that you have to make sure to find a blank part or else you don’t move the paper but the object on the paper.

Just tap on the paper and drag it into the desired direction. If you let go, the display is redrawn and the paper moved the amount you dragged it.

Center

If you ever loose you position in the big white world of the mostly empty virtual paper space, you can use the “center” function in the map menu. It immediately navigates your display back to the center topic of the current map.

Search

Searching for text or text fragments is something a computer does very well. Pocket Mindmap provides search functionality with a small modeless floating dialog. This is especially useful if you have to visit several topics in sequence. Just type in the required text pattern and tap the find button on the small dialog. Pocket Mindmap positions the focus on the first topic matching the given search pattern. Now you can leave the floating search dialog open while working in the map – you can do all things you can do in the map like formatting, entering or reorganizing. If you have finished the work to be done on the topic you can just tap again on the find button in the dialog to jump to the next matching topic. If you don’t need the search dialog anymore you can just close it by tapping the “x” in its upper right corner.

Hyperlinks

This is one of the more powerful ways to navigate a map. Hyperlinks can be associated to topics in Pocket Mindmap. They are indicated in the map with a Magic Symbol. There are different Magic Symbols for different types of hyperlinks. Hyperlinks can point to

 

Topics in the same map

Topics in another map in the same document

Topics in another document

Documents

URLs (http)

 

Broken Hyperlinks are indicated with a special sign, so you know about links into “Nirvana” without trying them.

 

Map Link

Map Links look similar to hyperlinks and they work similar when tapped on – they navigate to the target, in this case the linked map. But map links are different from hyperlinks in several important aspects. For one, they are not represented by a URL or kind of address of the target. Instead the map itself is located behind the link. So it is not possible to have two different Map Links pointing to the same map.

Whenever you see the red arrow of a map link, there is a physical map behind it. This is important when you are going to delete a topic with a Map Link – the operation will also delete the whole linked map. With a hyperlink this would not be the case.

Read more on Map Links in the chapter on “Promoting to Map”.

 

In case you get lost in your maps labyrinth, try the Select function from the Maps menu. It gives you a hierarchical view of your maps and allows easy navigating between maps.

Select Map

This Function gives you an outline of your map structure for easy navigation. Just select your destination map in the tree and tap the OK button. The function is located in the map menu.

Reference Jump

References are represented by arrows in the map view. They give you a visual presentation of the relation of the involved topics. The arrows can also be used for navigational purposes. When you tap your stylus on one endpoint of an arrow, Pocket Mindmap navigates you to the other end of the arrow. This way it is very easy to explore the relationships defined by References.

If you tap a reference arrow anywhere else, a balloon box pops up, telling you about the relation the reference defines.

Back and Forward arrows

Whatever way you use to navigate you map, whenever you select a topic, it is written into an internal history list of positions you visited. These positions (i.e. topics) can be revisited by using the back button in the menu bar (a sky blue left arrow). This function also has a partner, the forward arrow. They both work very similar to the arrow buttons in a web browser. If you used the back key to revisit a topic, you can afterward use the forward key to jump to the position you where before you used the back key.  This history jumping also works if you change the map or even the document by using a hyperlink. If you close Pocket Mindmap, the history is cleared.

 

 

Entering Topics

You enter a new topic by pressing the new function in the menu bar and typing the title of the topic in the appearing input field, depending on the settings of your Pocket PC, by the (virtual) keyboard or by the character recognizer. Now you can choose to edit other properties in the open dialog like the font family or the color of the font as well as the font size or the marker color, or just close it by tapping OK. After the Menu is closed you find you new topic added to the map. You can repeat this as often as you like – every time a new topic is added to the map. Depending on the topic you have selected while tapping on the new function, the newly created topic is placed either as a child topic of the currently selected topic or as a new first level topic, which in fact is a child of the central topic.

Another way to enter new topics is to just begin to type the title. Pocket Mindmap adds the new title as a subtopic to the currently selected one, or, if none is selected, as a new top level topic. This is a very easy and quick way, especially during brain storming sessions, to enter just topic titles.

Double tapping on the title of a topic opens the properties dialog again. Alternatively you can tap and hold on a topic title to open its context menu and then choose the Edit Topic function. If you tap once on an already selected topic, in-place-editing is activated, and you edit the topic title in place without opening a dialog.

Multi Line Titles

If you want to enter a multi line title, you can split the title line by entering a pipe symbol (“|”) into the text. Pocket Mindmap splits the line at the symbol.

Arrange Topics

You arrange first level topics by just dragging them with your stylus to the desired position. The first level topics are the only topics that can be positioned in such a way.  Other topics are positioned automatically by Pocket Mindmap below their parent topic. Anyway, you can change the order of the automatically positioned topics by dragging them within their list up or down. Watch the drop indicator on the nodes you are hovering over to see if the topic becomes the predecessor or successor of the target topic. Moving aside, the dropped topic becomes subjugated to the target topic. This may require a bit of practicing, but is very effective and easy then.

Of course you can also use copy, cut and paste for the arrangement of your topics.

Pocket Mindmap remembers the positions of your first level topics even if you reorder the topics in the outline view. The actual order in outline view and the positions of the first level topics are kept independently. When exporting topics to text or HTML, the order from the outline view is sufficient. If you have to adapt the order from one view to the other, you can use the Helper Function to achieve this. Read more on this in the Helper Function Section on page 21.

Delete Topics

If you delete a topic with the Delete function, a dialog appears asking whether you want to delete subtopics as well or only the current topic. If you choose to delete topics, this includes also the associated data, like scribbles, custom properties and references to or from these topics. If you choose to preserve subtopics, they are moved up one level.

 

Promoting to Map

Whenever your map becomes very big and/or your restructuring indicates that some of the topics are a subject of their own but still belong to this main map, you can promote a tree of topics to an own map. Just tap and hold on a topic and execute “Promote to Map” from the appearing context menu. Pocket Mindmap takes the current topic and makes it the new central topic in a new map. All child topics are transferred to this new map. Pocket Mindmap also changes the focus to the new map, where the new central topic is visible. Note the red left arrow near the title! This Magic Symbol indicates that this is a subjugated map. The arrow also performs as a map link back to the original map if you tap on it. After the tap you are retransferred to the original map. Note that the promoted topic is still in place. This is the visible representation of the new promoted map. The red right arrow indicates the sub map.

The promoted map is still located in the current Pocket Mindmap document. Promoting a Map does not mean to export it as a separate map. You can at anytime demote the map back to the original map. No information is lost except the positions of the first level nodes in the sub map. The function to demote a map is available in the context menu of the topic that has the map link Magic Symbol.

To see an overview of your map structure, use the Select function from the Map menu. It gives you the hierarchical view of your map structure in the current Pocket Mindmap document.

 

References

References are displayed in a map as an arrow connecting the related topics. References are only visible when both related topics are on the current map, but they can be defined to connect topics on different maps, as long as both are in the same document. Such References are not visible in the map view, but in the References tab of the Properties dialog of the topic or as Indicators in the Outline view. Of course, they are also contained in the data model of the xml file for further usage.

 

References are either directed references with an originating topic and a target topic, or bidirectional references. The direction of the reference is indicated by the arrow head(s).  If you tap with your Stylus on an arrow near its end- or starting point, you are moved to the other end of the arrow, bringing the related topic into view. This is called a Reference Jumping and is an easy and quick way to navigate your map.

References are mainly defined by their type. The type defines how references are named, how they appear and what relation they define.

 

Reference Types

If you want to select a Reference, for example to edit its type, direction or path within the map, you can tap and hold it. The opening context menu allows you to operate on it. If you choose select from the menu, you enter the mode to modify the path of the arrow. The path is shaped by a Bezier curve, which is controlled by their end points, and two more points acting as control handles. You can drag the control handles to reshape the curve.

 

Reference Types are defined in a global list, so if you define a new type, you can use it in all your maps. The type is also stored within the map itself, so if you give away the map document, the type definition of the reference is available on the viewers Pocket Mindmap too. But it is not automatically copied to the global list of that User – it is only for using it in the map that contains the definition. Such reference types are map based types. Pocket Mindmap provides functionality to copy such map based styles into the global list. It is also possible to copy a type from the global list to a map. This functionality is located in the Option dialog on the references tab. There is a button titled “Manage reference types”. This manager displays a list off all available reference types – the global ones and also those of the currently open map, if it contains other types as your global list. If the map based types are identical to that in the global list, they are not displayed.

The List uses different symbols to distinguish between Reference Types in the global list and map based Reference Types. The global items show a globe in the symbol.

 

The manager provides a toolbar with the following functionality:

 

1.      Create a new Reference Type

2.      Edit an existing Reference Type

3.      Set a Reference Type as default

4.      Delete a Reference Type

5.      Transfer a Reference Type to the currently open Document.

6.      Transfer a Reference Type to the global list.

 

Creating a new Reference Type requires you to enter some information on the type. The type has at least a unique name. If you press the button to create a new Reference Type, enter the name of the type in the field labeled “Type”. There is another field, labeled “Reverse type”. Here you can enter the so called R-Type of the reference. To explain this we have to think about a reference as a relation between two topics. The reference defines such a relation. Let us think of a relation that defines a successor to something. We name the relation “Successor”. Imagine a map with two topics: “A” and “B”. No we set a reference on them, defining “B” as successor to “A”. Now we could ask a question on the relation of both topics from the view of “B”. The answer would be that “A” is the predecessor of “B”. That’s the R-Type: Predecessor. The Predecessor is optional. If you omit it in the type definition, both relations are the same in bidirectional relations. Note that even in bidirectional relations the direction is important because of the inverse meaning of the R-Type. You can visualize the relation by tapping on the arrow in the map view – a bubble help shows you the defined relation.

You can also define the appearance in the map view or set the relation to hidden. This is normally done for relations where the visual appearance is not required or not so important. There is a global option to even show hidden relations and another to hide them all (visible and invisible).

Relations may also be unidirectional, like the “see also” reference. They have only one arrowhead.

Pocket Mindmap suggests the Default Reference Type only the first time during a session – after that it remembers which Reference Type you used the last time and suggests that. This behavior makes it easy to apply many references of the same type in sequence.

 

Magic Symbols

The state and type of a topic in the map view is sometimes accomplished by so called Magic Symbols. Unlike normal symbols, which can be associated manually, Magic Symbols tell you something about the type or the state of the topic. For example a topic, which is defined as a task, indicates this by showing the Magic Symbol “Checkbox”. If the box is checked, it indicates that the task is completed. There is also a color code to show you if the task due date is near or even has passed. See the details on color codes in the reference on Pocket Mindmap.

 

Adding Scribbles

To add a Scribble, tap and hold the topic and choose Scribble from the appearing context menu.

Read more on Scribbles in the Chapter “Scribble Editor”.

Scribble Editor

Scribbles are little drawings. They provide different pens and colors and you can selectively erase the strokes. Scribbles are assigned to topics, and each topic can hold one Scribble.

The Scribbles are stored within the Pocket Mindmap document, so there is no need to keep an eye on externally linked drawings. Since Scribbles are stored in a vector format (Strokes), they are usually much more compact than a bitmap, especially if few strokes are used to outline something. Note that it is possible to create very big drawings just by adding an excessive amount of strokes to the scribble. Just experiment a bit with Scribbles and watch the size of the document to get a feeling for the memory requirements. Note, that the canvas of the scribble, like the canvas of the Mindmap is much larger than the display.

Scribble is a Stroke recorder. The Stroke is the entity that is stored by the program, and a Stroke is also the entity you can select and delete within the drawing. Imagine a stroke as one continuous drawing action.

 

The Scribble Editor provides the following features:

 

Pen size (thickness, 4 different)

Pen color (256 colors)

Free drawing

Select single stroke

Select rectangle

Delete selected strokes

 

Pen width

Scribble provides four different grades of a pen. Choose the desired one by tapping on the button in the toolbar. It is the one with the vertical line. On each tap, it changes the thickness of the line to indicate the current setting.

Pen Color

As known from the Marker functionality, the color of the pen can be chosen from a popup palette, presenting 256 colors. Just tap the desired one. Tap outside the palette or on the toolbar button to dismiss the palette without choosing a color.

Free Drawing

It is not necessary to explain this. Just draw.

Select single Stroke

If you made a mistake or changed you mind, you can delete an unwanted stroke from your Scribble. To delete it, you first must select it. Choose the selection tool from the toolbar, it is the white arrow. With this arrow tap on the stroke you want to select. If you don’t miss it, scribble indicates the selected Stroke by changing its appearance. It looks like an ant line. You can deselect strokes by tapping them again with the selection tool. It works like a toggle. This way you can select or deselect as many strokes as you want.

Select Rectangle

A quicker way to select more than one stroke is by opening a rectangle with the selection tool. Any stroke that is touched by the rectangle changes its selection state. Note that it is not required to include the full stroke within the rectangle to change the selection state.

Delete selected Strokes

To delete any selected strokes just execute the “Delete” function within the Stroke menu. Don’t mix this up with the “Delete Scribble” function in the Tools menu, which deletes the whole Scribble independent of any selection.

Unselect a complex selection

If you want to unselect a complex selection at once, just deactivate the selection tool by clicking on the pen button to get rid of the selection.

Outline View

In this view, the map is displayed as an outline. In the toolbar is a button to open a text window, where you can view and edit the text of the currently selected topic. In the outline view you also find the export functions.

Export

Since these functions are not limited to export the whole document but are able to handle partly exports as well, they are placed in the context menu of the outline view. Tap and hold on any node in the tree view and chose the desired export from the menu. Note: only the selected node and its subtopics are exported. If you want to export the whole outline, just tap and hold the central topic (top of the outline).

 

Note that topics marked as “internal” are not exported with these functionalities. However, they can be copied through the clipboard and are of course part of the saved document file.

Text Export

This export copies the chosen sub tree as text into the clipboard of the Pocket PC. You can change to another application and paste into it. Try it with Notes or Pocket Word.

You can also copy a topic with its sub topics in map view to the clipboard. Pocket Mindmap supports (among others) a simple text format for the clipboard that can be pasted into other applications.

HTML Export

This export requires you to enter a filename for the exported data. The chosen sub tree is then written to that file in the HTML format. The format is designed in a way that allows you to open it on you Desktop PC with Microsoft Word for Windows and work on it as a real outline. This is very useful when you created a rough outline of you ideas on the Pocket PC and want to elaborate on that on the desktop PC where writing greater amounts of text is more comfortable.

Of course you can also publish this format on a web server – it is HTML.

Bitmap Export

The Bitmap export creates a picture of the current map of your document. Note that the Bitmap Export is not located in the Outline View, but in the Map Views Tools menu. The Bitmap is exported as a BMP file, and is by default compressed. This compression is known as RLE Encoding (Run Length Encoding). The resulting bitmap files take much less memory to store, which is an important aspect on a memory limited device. Unfortunately, the Pocket PC has no built in software to display such bitmaps. The intention is to use the bitmaps on a desktop PC after transfer. You can tell Pocket Mindmap in the Options to save the bitmap in the uncompressed format for usage with the built in programs. See the Options section for details.

Task View

The Task List gives you a hierarchy independent view on the topics. The term “Task List” may be somewhat confusing because this view not only shows tasks. Its powerful filter options allow you to extract exact the subset of information from your Pocket Mindmap document that you need. The default setting is to show you the topics of the Pocket Mindmap that are declared as tasks.

The filter can combine many different aspects and properties of you topics. This includes task options as well as symbols, text fragments or even custom properties. With such a combination this is a very powerful tool. Common Tasks are:

 

-          Extract all topics with a Question mark symbol for further elaboration.

-          Extract unfinished tasks (and export them to Pocket Outlook!)

-          Extract topics regarding specific persons. You can code the personal assignment in custom properties or just name them in the text. The filter allows you to extract the topics.

-          If your Pocket Mindmap document is organized into different maps, you can narrow the filter to include only specific maps into the extract.

Helper Functions

There is one special menu point in the Tools menu called Helper Functions. Here you find usually not so frequently used functionality which still can be very useful.

Outlook

Re-Link Tasks

This function traverses all your Pocket Outlook Tasks and veryfies if there is an according task in your current Mindmap. If this is the case, the Link between them is reestablished.

This Operation is required when the link between the Tasks is broken due to a transfer orreinstallation of the software. The link is internally maintained by the so called OID of the message in Outlook. If this changes for any reason, the link is broken. Pocket Mindmap for this case has added a special ID, like a finger print, to the Outlook task, so the Re-Link can identify tasks that should be linked.

Map

Order

Pocket Mindmap maintains two lists of order for the topics – one in each view (Outline and Mindmap). IF you want to change one of them to the other, you can use this helper function to do so.

Index


Adding Scribbles................................... 17

Arrange Topics..................................... 13

associated data...................................... 14

Back and Forward arrows..................... 12

Bezier curve.......................................... 15

Bitmap Export....................................... 20

brainstorming........................................... 7

Brainstorming.......................................... 7

Broken Hyperlinks................................ 11

CAMM.................................................. 5

Center................................................... 10

center topic............................................. 7

Checkbox............................................. 17

clipboard................................................. 6

color codes........................................... 17

Computer Aided Mind Mapping.............. 5

context menu......................................... 15

control handles...................................... 15

copy & paste.......................................... 6

Delete selected Strokes......................... 19

Delete Topics........................................ 13

display size.............................................. 5

drawings............................................... 17

Drop....................................................... 8

Entering Topics..................................... 12

export functions..................................... 19

filter...................................................... 21

first level topic....................................... 12

floating search dialog............................. 10

formatting................................................ 6

Free Drawing........................................ 18

General Concepts.................................... 5

global list............................................... 15

Handheld PC.......................................... 7

Helper Function..................................... 13

Helper Functions................................... 21

Hierarchical view................................... 14

HTML.................................................. 19

HTML Export....................................... 20

Hyperlinks............................................. 10

Magic Symbol................................... 9, 14

Magic Symbols..................................... 17

main map................................................ 7

Main Topic............................................. 7

Map Editor............................................. 9

Map Helper Function............................ 22

Map Link.............................................. 11

Mind Mapping........................................ 4

Multi Line Titles..................................... 13

multiple maps.......................................... 7

Navigating............................................... 9

New Menu.............................................. 6

OID...................................................... 21

Option dialog........................................ 15

Order Helper Function.......................... 22

Outline View......................................... 19

Outlook................................................ 21

Panning................................................. 10

Pen Color............................................. 18

Pen size................................................. 18

Pen width.............................................. 18

Pocket Outlook..................................... 21

Pocket PC applications........................... 7

Promoting a Map.................................. 14

Promoting to Map................................. 14

Qualifying................................................ 8

Reference Jump..................................... 11

Reference Types................................... 15

References........................................ 8, 14

Related topics....................................... 14

relation.................................................. 15

Relations............................................... 14

Restructuring........................................... 8

RLE Encoding....................................... 20

R-Type................................................. 16

Run Length Encoding............................. 20

Scribble................................................ 17

Scribble Editor...................................... 17

Scribbles................................................. 9

Scrolling.................................................. 9

Search.................................................. 10

Select.................................................... 11

Select Map........................................... 11

Select Rectangle.................................... 19

Select single Stroke............................... 18

Stroke recorder..................................... 17

subjugate................................................. 8

Task View............................................ 20

Text Export........................................... 20

Topic order........................................... 13

visual appearance.................................. 16

visualize relation..................................... 16


 



[1] “Mind Map“ and „Mind Mapping“ are registered Trademarks of Tony Buzan, the inventor of Mind Mapping and writer of many books on the subject.

 
 
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